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motor vehicle accidents Archives

When it comes to driving, one distraction can lead to another

Drivers in Montana might believe that using hands-free cellphones while driving cuts down in distracted driving behavior, but data analyzed and released by Lytx, a company specializing in analyzing data and providing safety solutions for driving fleets in the commercial and public sectors, shows that the use of hands-free devices might actually lead to drivers engaging in at least one additional distracting activity.

AAA study highlights the limitations of hi-tech safety systems

Dealer showrooms in Montana and around the country are filled with cars that boast an impressive array of safety features, but some of the most advanced automobile technology could actually be contributing to accidents according to a study conducted recently by the American Automobile Association and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The association's Foundation for Traffic Safety wanted to find out how adaptive cruise control and lane departure assist systems influenced driver behavior, so researchers watched videos of people behind the wheels of cars such as the Honda Accord, Tesla Model S and Acura MDX.

Fewer crash fatalities, but pedestrians face higher risk

For many drivers in Montana, the reported decline in roadway deaths in 2018 is relieving news pointing to greater safety on the roads. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reported that 35,560 people were killed in motor vehicle collisions last year, a 2.4% decline over 2017 figures, which themselves reflected a decrease over the prior year. According to the NHTSA, these positive statistics are continuing with the first half of 2019 showing a 3.4% decline in highway fatalities. At the same time, however, pedestrians and cyclists may have additional cause for concern.

Montana among worst states for teen drunk driving

Researchers at CheapCarInsuranceQuotes.com have come out with a list of the 15 worst states when it comes to teen drinking and driving. The study shows that there may be a connection between the number of high school students who drink and drive and the rate of drunk driving fatalities. Montana residents will want to know more because this state was third on the list.

What to be aware of when driving this fall

Drivers in Montana and throughout the United States need to be aware of the potential dangers that they face while driving during the fall season. For instance, roads can become slick when they are covered by rain or leaves that are falling off trees. In addition to making roads slippery, falling leaves can obscure traffic lines and other important markings. If rain and leaves are on the road at the same time, it can feel as if a person is driving on ice.

Study reveals how effective automatic car safety systems can be

The vast majority of car accidents in Montana and around the country involve some kind of human error. Car manufacturers have introduced a range of features in recent years that are designed to monitor road conditions and step in when drivers become distracted or make mistakes, and a recent study reveals that they can be extremely effective. Researchers from the University of Michigan studied accident reports from 10 states to gauge the effectiveness of safety features like automatic braking systems, blind spot monitors and lane departure warnings, and they discovered that they can cut the number of some kinds of accidents almost in half.

Drowsy driving, an underreported trend

Up to 9.5% of all auto accidents are due to drowsy driving according to a 2018 AAA study. This is a startling departure from government reports in the past, which estimated that between 1% and 2% of crashes are caused by drowsiness. The figure 9.5% is high when Montana residents consider that according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, drunk driving is to blame for 5% of all crashes.

Why individuals should avoid drowsy driving

Those who choose to drive on Montana roads should make sure that they are not sleep deprived or under the influence of sleep medication. According to a Consumer Reports survey, roughly 20% of respondents who took prescription sleep aids did so less than seven hours before driving a vehicle. The directions say that an individual should wait at least seven hours before driving to avoid doing so while groggy.

Social media a major source of distracted driving

Root Insurance has shared the results of an online study conducted by Wakefield Research, and they may be surprising to some drivers in Montana. Of the nearly 2,000 drivers who responded to the survey, about half claimed that distracted driving is their top concern when on the road, yet the respondents were found to use their phones for an average of 13 minutes every day behind the wheel.

Contact

Towe & Fitzpatrick, PLLC
619 SW Higgins, Ste. O
P.O. Box 1745
Missoula, MT 59806

Phone: 406-203-5148
Phone: 406-829-1669
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